On behalf of Hastings Law Firm P.C. posted in Hospital Negligence on Friday, May 23, 2014.

When people visit the hospital, they expect to get well after receiving the treatment they need. They usually don’t expect to get sicker as a result of being in the hospital. However, many patients are getting infections within Texas hospitals, and an infection can change their lives for the worse.

For instance, one man recently went to a medical center to undergo a minor surgery on a damaged Achilles tendon. However, he left the hospital with an infection known as pseudomonas. As a result, he needed heavy doses of antibiotics over a 10-day period, two times a day. However, he ended up struggling with the infection for over two years, including having to spend more than a month in a hyperbaric chamber. His medical expenses are now more than $100,000.

About one out of 25 people get infections from the hospital setting, and more than 70,000 die from them every year. This is because patients are around pathogens that can make them sick. Many hospitals have adjusted their disinfection procedures to deal with the problem. In addition, hospital staff are urged to cleanse their hands frequently.

The Texas Department of State Health Services is now publishing hospital infection rates for the public to view. The information covers both infections in the bloodstream, as well as those at surgical sites. Many hospitals in Houston actually have infection rates that are considered worse than what patients throughout the nation experience. If a person in our state suffers an infection due to a hospital’s negligence, he or she may pursue financial damages through a medical malpractice suit. Financial restitution from a suit that is fought victoriously can help with medical costs connected to the situation, as well as other financial damages recognized by our law..

Source: click2houston.com, “Infections inside hospitals attacking patients”, Bill Spencer, May 9, 2014

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